Jessica Jubb // Gidgegannup, WA

Jeweller Jessica Jubb outside her Gidgegannup home and studio, Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Jeweller Jessica Jubb outside her Gidgegannup home and studio, Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Self Actualisation Hakea Pendant made from hand-cut, embossed and engraved copper, boxed up and ready to be sent to a city client by jeweller Jessica Jubb in her Gidgegannup studio, Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Self Actualisation Hakea Pendant made from hand-cut, embossed and engraved copper, boxed up and ready to be sent to a city client by jeweller Jessica Jubb in her Gidgegannup studio, Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

A repurposed slab of local jarrah forms a solid work bench inside jeweller Jessica Jubb's studio in Gidgegannup, Western Australia.  Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

A repurposed slab of local jarrah forms a solid work bench inside jeweller Jessica Jubb’s studio in Gidgegannup, Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

I love a good collection. As a collector/hoarder/op-shop desperado myself, I love to poke my head into other people’s homes and see what they compulsively group together. Jessica Jubb’s Gidgegannup studio has prints, embroidery and tea towels featuring Australian flowers and landscapes, bunches of knitting needles (briefly difficult to find when everyone was making bent bracelets in the early 2000’s, now fully stocked in all country towns), tins with some of that deliciously faded graphic art – obviously a utilitarian necessity to pile other smaller collections in. Above all of these second hand treasures, Jubb collects leaves, leaves and some more leaves and she doesn’t have to travel far to gather these shapely specimens, whose form ranges from long and spiky to….short and spiky – the Aussie bush is a really scratchy place. How people lived here pre-Blundstones for more than 40,000 years still blows my mind every time I go walking and get poked through my jeans.

Jessica Jubb spent her childhood wandering the bushland in Parkerville, in the Mundaring Valley outside Perth in Western Australia. Her parents, European migrants who were completely taken with the Australian landscape, inspired a lifetime of botanical curiosity – so much so, that after many years living in the city, Jubb made the move back out to the same area, with her jewellery studio in tow. The home and studio that she shares with her partner Grayson, a wine distributor, is on a beautiful property on the Wooroloo Brook. Jubb’s collections of leaves from the area become a launching point for her jewellery design- each piece, an extension of her philosophy on design and life.

Whilst my botanical descriptions peak at ‘spiky’, hers are a little more refined and Jubb’s knowledge on all things shrubbery made for a beautiful and educational walk on the day of the shoot. I have even managed to come home this week and recognise plants that are shared between Denmark and Gidgegannup, which now remind me of that walk.

It’s a busy run until the end of the year for Jubb. This weekend she begins a fortnight as the artist in residence with her regular stockists, Aspects of Kings Park as part of their annual Spring Festival. Jubb is also hosting an open studio event for two days over the last weekend in October as part of the larger Mundaring Hills Open Studios event. All are welcome, so bring a picnic! In early December, she’ll have new work at the Freo Bazaar – a wonderful three day market with loads of talented Western Australian craftspeople and artists. On top of all of this, she has a couple of public sculptures in the pipeline and is teaching herself 3D modelling.

If lieu of taking a walk with her, Jessica Jubb’s Instagram account is the first stop to exploring her property and life. To get your hands on her work, check out her web shop.

P.S If there are any other artists out there living with a wine distributor, please contact me IMMEDIATELY so that I may continue to drink french wine and eat cheese in the manner I’ve now grown accustomed to. Thanks Grayson!

Jeweller Jessica Jubb in her Gidgegannup studio, where she uses traditional techniques as well as translating hand sketches into digital designs. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Jeweller Jessica Jubb in her Gidgegannup studio, where she uses traditional techniques as well as translating hand sketches into digital designs. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Jeweller Jessica Jubb uses techniques including etching and hand painting to make her Gondwana Collection earrings at her Gidgegannup studio in Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Jeweller Jessica Jubb uses techniques including etching and hand painting to make her Gondwana Collection earrings at her Gidgegannup studio in Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Details inside jeweller Jessica Jubb's Gidgegannup studio, Western Australia include precision tools, little collections from op-shops and the beautiful property she lives and works from. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Details inside jeweller Jessica Jubb’s Gidgegannup studio, Western Australia include precision tools, little collections from op-shops and the beautiful property she lives and works from. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Sketches and leaves are in abundance in jeweller Jessica Jubb's studio in Gidgegannup, Western Australia.Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Sketches and leaves are in abundance in jeweller Jessica Jubb’s studio in Gidgegannup, Western Australia.Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Inside jeweller Jessica Jubb's studio in Gidgegannup, Western Australia an op-shop ironing board finds new life as an adjustable work top.  Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Inside jeweller Jessica Jubb’s studio in Gidgegannup, Western Australia an op-shop ironing board finds new life as an adjustable work top. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

You are nourished both for your work and yourself by the forms of the Australian bush – where did this passion come from?
My passion and interest in the Australian bush was nurtured through childhood by my parents. I was born into their chosen new world in the Perth hills they discovered together as immigrants, looking for adventure beyond England and Italy. They were completely taken by the Australian landscape and the variety of flora and fauna. As a kid, I was encouraged to investigate the endless discoveries found on our Parkerville family property. Our house was opposite a large bush reserve and de-commissioned quarry and this was the playground for my sister and I. We loved it! We would spend our time wandering and exploring. One of the highlights was lifting up old sheets of tin – I remember being filled with anticipation, adrenalin pumping, at the prospect of finding a huge Red Back spider or a lizard or snake.Somehow these early nature experiences have evolved into an artistic career. My sister is now a biological scientist and I think it could have gone either way for both of us.
The biggest feature and influence beyond my parents was the local bush. My interest in my environment evolved very naturally – it was normal to be connected to it. I was quietly enchanted and completely absorbed by the changing seasons and cycles – no two days ever the same. When I left home I chose new adventures and spent my 20’s and into my 30s in cities. I have only recently moved back to the hills in the past couple of years. The distance from them made it obvious to me that nature is a part of me and me a part of nature – particularly this little patch of the world. It has definitely taken over my current work, most of it now relates somehow to things I encounter on my morning walks. It’s lovely to be immersed again.
What kind of processes do you use in your work?

I love using technology and these days I use Adobe Illustrator to translate hand sketches into digital designs. These are more easily catalogued, adjusted and transferred to other applications. I’m not particularly attached to any one medium or process but love to explore and pair techniques together from different disciplines. For example, I am currently using etching techniques in my jewellery work. I re-discovered etching while I was making public art, exploring industrial processes, and these are techniques I once learned long ago during my study of printmaking.I also like to use uncomplicated processes – like hand saw piercing or heat working metal.  I like the transparency and truth held in these enduring techniques passed down through generations. It’s grounding. I feel a connection to past peoples and continuing parts of tradition. It makes me feel less like I was born in the middle of nowhere without an obvious cultural heritage! It also blows my mind to think of all that has gone before – It helps me put things in perspective when I get too focused on a tiny little detail – which is a frequent hazard of the job!

What brought you back to this area after years of city life?

A big reason for returning back to the hills was to live a more balanced and creative life. I felt like I needed freedom from the pressures of mainstream cultures’ cycle of consumption and production. It was wearing me down – and I didn’t want to consume or produce anymore. It was making it impossible to be creative. I’ve done some voluntary downshifting since and life here feels positive and creative again. This returning to place fits for me. I guess I turned out to be a brand of hippy too. I’ve found myself in an environment where I am able to make my life and make my work as celebrations of things that I think matter the most.

Hakea cristata leaves on the property of jeweller Jessica Jubb in Gidgegannup, Western Australia, where the formations of leaves make for more than a passing influence on her work.  Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Hakea cristata leaves on the property of jeweller Jessica Jubb in Gidgegannup, Western Australia, where the formations of leaves make for more than a passing influence on her work. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Xanthorrhoea grass trees and granite rocks along a ridgeline on a walk with jeweller Jessica Jubb in Gidgegannup, Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Xanthorrhoea grass trees and granite rocks along a ridgeline on a walk with jeweller Jessica Jubb in Gidgegannup, Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Jeweller Jessica Jubb walking on her Gidgegannup property in Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Jeweller Jessica Jubb walking on her Gidgegannup property in Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Inside jeweller Jessica Jubb's Gidgegannup studio, Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Inside jeweller Jessica Jubb’s Gidgegannup studio, Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Details inside jeweller Jessica Jubb's Gidgegannup studio, Western Australia include a Banksia Grandis Super Cuff from the Gondwana Collection. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Details inside jeweller Jessica Jubb’s Gidgegannup studio, Western Australia include a Banksia Grandis Super Cuff from the Gondwana Collection. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Etched, oxidised stainless steel and sterling silver Acacia and Banksia earrings by jeweller Jessica Jubb in her studio in Gidgegannup, Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite.

Etched, oxidised stainless steel and sterling silver Acacia and Banksia earrings by jeweller Jessica Jubb in her studio in Gidgegannup, Western Australia. Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite.

A bobtail soaking up some winter sun on a bush track gave us a little fright on jeweller Jessica Jubb's Gidgegnanup property.Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

A bobtail soaking up some winter sun on a bush track gave us a little fright on jeweller Jessica Jubb’s Gidgegnanup property.Photo Bo Wong // Design Satellite

Trackbacks

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>